Master of Science in Historic Preservation College of Design

Faculty

 

Melanie Adams, Senior Director of Guest Experience and Educational Services at the Minnesota Historical Society

Institutional Affiliation: Minnesota Historical Society

email: melanie.adams@mnhs.org

 

Scholarly Interests: Melanie Adams is the Senior Director of Guest Experience and Educational Services at the Minnesota Historical Society where she oversees education, exhibitions, and 26 historic sites. Before joining the MNHS, she served as the Managing Director for Community Education and Events at the Missouri Historical Society for twelve years. Prior to working with museums, she spent twelve years in Student Affairs working at the University of California, Berkeley, California State University, Northridge, and Washington University in St. Louis.


In her role with the Missouri Historical Society, she created the community education and events department and strengthened the museum’s ties to the community. To compliment her work at the museum, she was active in the community by serving on numerous boards including nine years on the St. Louis Public Schools Special Administrative Board. She is past president of the Association of Midwest Museums and current council member of the American Association of State and Local Historical Societies. She was an adjunct instructor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis where she taught classes on Critical Race Theory and the history of African American education in Missouri. Her writing credits include articles in Museum Magazine, AASLH Magazine, and an upcoming children’s book on St. Louis Civil Right’s history. She received her B.A from the University of Virginia, her M.Ed from the University of Vermont, and her Ph.D from the University of Missouri.

 

 

Amber Annis, Inclusion and Community Engagement Specialist at the Minnesota Historical Society

Institutional Affiliation: Minnesota Historical Society

email: amber.annis@mnhs.org

 

Scholarly Interests: Amber Annis is a doctoral candidate currently completing her dissertation in the American Studies department at the University of Minnesota. She received her B.A. in History and American Indian Studies and her M.A. in History from the University of North Dakota. Amber is a citizen of the Cheyenne River Sioux Nation and her current research interests include American Indian public history, sovereignty and resources in the 20th century and specifically the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe’s engagement with U.S. nationalism and militarization. Amber also continues her work as a research affiliate for the Harvard Project of American Indian Economic Development’s Honoring Nations Program and the national public program States of Incarceration.

 

Amber works within the Department of Inclusion and Community Engagement at the Minnesota Historical Society. She works in collaboration with the Heritage Studies and Public History program as an adjunct instructor and internship coordinator.

 

 

 

Rebecca E. Bria, Assistant Professor

Department: Anthropology

email: rebria@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Rebecca Bria is an anthropologist whose research examines prehistoric community formation and issues of indigenous identity and heritage in highland Peru. In particular, Bria’s multi-year archaeological research project and field school has yielded new knowledge regarding the disintegration of the first pan-Andean religion and political network, called Chavín, and the practices whereby people forged new cultural and political values—especially regarding food, land, ritual, authority, and community—in the wake of Chavín’s collapse. Bria is also deeply invested in cultural heritage, and she works with indigenous Andean communities to co-create heritage events and museum installations that combine digital technologies and ethnographic approaches to represent how people in the Andean countryside perceive and value the past. Bria has also innovated digital archaeology methods for social science and humanities research and teaching.

 

 

Brenda Child, Professor

Department: American Studies; American Indian Studies

email: child011@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Brenda J. Child is a Professor of American Studies and former Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota. She received her PhD in History at the University of Iowa. Her first book, Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940 (University of Nebraska, 1998), won the North American Indian Prose Award. Child’s newest books are Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community (Penguin, 2012) and Indian Subjects: Hemispheric Perspectives on the History of Indigenous Education (with Brian Klopotek, SAR Press, 2014). A recent book, My Grandfather’s Knocking Sticks: Ojibwe Family Life and Labor on the Reservation (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2014) combines a family memoir of her grandparents’ working lives, with a broader history of others of their generation. It won the National American Indian Book Award from Arizona State University, the Best Book in Midwestern History from the Midwestern History Association, and is a current nominee for a bi-annual Minnesota Book Award for Best Book on Minnesota History.

 

Child is a trustee of the National Museum of the American Indian-Smithsonian. She serves on the Repatriation Committee, the Executive Committee, and Chairs the Scholarship and Collections Committee. She is also a trustee of the Minnesota Historical Society. She was an original consultant to the exhibit, "Remembering Our Indian School Days" at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona and co-author of the book that accompanied it, Away From Home (Heard, 2000). The exhibit is credited with increasing attendance at the Heard Museum, especially Indian visitors, and she is now part of a team reinterpreting the exhibit. At the University of Minnesota, she was a recipient of the President’s Award for Outstanding Community Service and is also part of a research group that developed a major digital humanities project, the Ojibwe People’s Dictionary (ojibwe.lib.umn.edu), which launched as a website in 2012. Child was born on the Red Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota where she is a citizen and member of an eight-person committee engaging the community and writing a new constitution for the nation of 14,700. She resides with her family in Saint Paul and Bemidji, Minnesota.


 

Karen Mary Davalos, Professor

Department: American Indian Studies; Affiliate Faculty History

email: kdavalos@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Karen Mary Davalos is Professor of Chicano and Latino Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. She has published widely on Chicana/o art, spirituality, and museums. Among her distinctions in the field, she is the only scholar to have written two books on Chicana/o museums, Exhibiting Mestizaje: Mexican (American) Museums in the Diaspora (University of New Mexico Press, 2001) and The Mexican Museum of San Francisco Papers, 1971-2006 (The Chicano Archives, vol. 3, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press, 2010, the Second Place winner of the International Latino Book Award for Best Reference Book in English). Her research and teaching interests in Chicana feminist scholarship, spirituality, art, exhibition practices, and oral history are reflected in her book, Yolanda M. López, (UCLA CSRC Press with distribution by University of Minnesota Press, 2008), the recipient of two book awards: 2010 Honorable Mention from the National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies and 2009 Honorable Mention from International Latino Book Awards (Nonfiction, Arts–Books in English). As lead coeditor of Chicana/Latina Studies: The Journal of Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social (2003-2009), she revitalized the journal from its earlier incarnation of Voces into the only interdisciplinary, flagship, peer-review journal of a Latina/o professional organization. She serves on the Board of Directors of Self Help Graphics and Art, the oldest Chicana/o – Latina/o arts organization in the Southern California. Her latest book, Chicana/o Remix: Art and Errata since the Sixties is due in July 2017. It is informed by life history interviews with eighteen artists, a decade of ethnographic research in southern California, and archival research examining fifty years of Chicana/o art in Los Angeles since 1963. She was an executive member of the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center’s advisory committee, L.A. Xicano, an initiative of the Getty Foundation Pacific Standard Time, which produced six Chicana/o art exhibitions in one season. Her research contributed to three of these exhibitions. In 2017, she will contribute to three Pacific Standard Time exhibitions, including the solo exhibition of Gilbert “Magu” Sanchez Lújan’s work at the University of California, Irvine. In 2012 she received the President’s Award for Art and Activism from the Women’s Caucus for Art.

 

 

Kirsten Delegard, Director, Mapping Prejudice Project

University affiliation: Borchert Map Library; Geography, Environment and Society Department, University of Minnesota

email: deleg008@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Kirsten Delegard is one of the co-founders of Mapping Prejudice and has a faculty affiliation with the Department of Geography, Environment and Society at the University of Minnesota.

A third generation Minneapolitan, Delegard has written extensively about the history of her hometown on the Historyapolis website. She has been a Legacy Research fellow at the Gale Library at the Minnesota Historical Society and has authored columns for the Southwest Journal as well as a short history of the battle over pornography in Minneapolis that was published in U.S. Women’s History: Untangling the Threads of Sisterhood.

 

Delegard holds a Ph.D. in history from Duke University and spent her graduate school years exploring American social movements, comparative women’s history and the history of women and politics in the United States. In 2012, the University of Pennsylvania Press published her book, Battling Miss Bolsheviki: The Origins of Female Conservatism in the United States. This book revisits the 1920s to chart the growth of a conservative women’s movement that would reshape the parameters of female political activism for the remainder of the twentieth century. Delegard was also the co-editor, with Nancy A. Hewitt, for the two volume textbook Women, Families and Communities: Readings in American History (Longman Publishing, 2008). She was also part of the team behind Mary Wingerd’s North Country: The Making of Minnesota (University of Minnesota Press, 2010). Delegard was the image curator for that volume, writing a series of interpretive essays that explained the visuals. In her spare time, Delegard thinks about writing a new history of Minneapolis that she has tentatively titled City of Light and Darkness: The Making of a Progressive Metropolis in Minneapolis.

 

 

 

Christine Taitano DeLisle, Assistant Professor

Department: American Indian Studies; Affiliate Faculty History

email: cdelisle@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: I’m a historian of the Pacific Islands with a specific focus on my home-island of Guåhan/Guam and the region of Micronesia. I’m interested in the intersections between colonialism, militarism, indigeneity, gender and sexuality as well as the tensions between history and historiography. I’ve been involved in the rewriting of Guam public school textbooks and the production of video documentaries on Micronesian seafaring and pre-World War II CHamoru pattera/midwives, which entailed extensive oral history work. I’ve curated several exhibits, including “I Kelat/The Fence”—the Guam component of the Smithsonian’s Museums on Main Street “Between Fences”—and contracted with Chicago’s Field in helping reconceptualize the museum’s display and use of the 19 th century Māori whare nui/meeting house and ancestor, Ruatepupuke. My current research examines indigeneity and gender vis a vis ancestral lands, museums, national parks, and ‘militourist’ destinations, and as articulated through
decolonizing theory and practice, especially indigenous feminism and women’s activism.
 

 

Vicente Diaz, Associate Professor

Department: American Indian Studies

email: vmdiaz@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Vicente M. Diaz is Pohnpeian and Filipino born and raised in Guam. He joined the faculty in American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities in 2015, where he heads the Canoe Crossings Project, an intercultural exchange program that brings Micronesian and Native Great Lakes canoebuilders and voyagers together, and the Digitizing Ancient Futures, a project that melds indigenous Micronesian seafaring knowledge and advanced visualization technology (virtual/augmented reality) in the interest of cultural loss mitigation and alternative and indigenous knowledge production practices. Diaz is a key figure in Native Pacific Cultural Studies, and a leader in efforts to build global and comparative indigenous studies. Before accepting his current position, Diaz taught American Indian Studies and Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (from 2012-2015), helped found Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies at the University of Michigan's Program in American Culture (2001-2012), and taught Pacific history and Micronesian studies at the University of Guam (1992-2001). His research and teachingninterests include de-colonial and indigenous historiography and cultural criticism, indigenous cultural revitalization, traditional seafaring, and Pacific Islander film, video, and digital mediation. Trained by navigators from Polowat atoll (utt Wenemai, Werieng school) in the Central Carolines, Diaz is also the former Coordinator of the Micronesian Seafaring Society, the founder of the Guam Traditional Seafarers Society, the utt Sahyan Tasi Fachemwan, producer/director/writer of the documentary, Sacred Vessels: Navigating Tradition and Identity in Micronesia (1996), and author of Repositioning the Missionary: Rewriting the Histories of Colonialism, Native Catholicism, and Indigeneity in Guam (University of Hawai’i, 2010). He is also the former Historian for Guam's Political Status Education Coordinating Commission (PSECC), a public commission that produced history and civics textbooks and curricular materials for Guam's K-12 Public School system as well as for the island's ongoing efforts to decolonize its political status as a U.S. possession

 

 

Greg Donofrio, Associate Professor

Department: Architecture; Affiliate Faculty Humphrey School of Public Affairs

email: donofrio@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Historic preservation planning and policy, including financial incentives; the history and theory of the historic preservation movement in the United States; community engagement, especially to advance diversity and inclusion in historic preservation and public history; the history of urban food systems in the United States during the twentieth century. Donofrio is a founding proposer of the HSPH program, has served on the board of the Preservation Alliance of Minnesota, and is currently co-editor of the journal Preservation Education & Research

 

 

Gail Dubrow, Professor

Department: Architecture; Landscape Architecture; History; Public Affairs & Planning

email: dubrow@umn.edu


Scholarly Interests: Historic Preservation and Public History. Research focus on preserving places significant in the history of American women, communities of color, LGBTQ, and other underrepresented groups.

 

 

Katherine Hayes, Associate Professor

Departments: Anthropology; American Indian Studies

email: kathayes@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Professor Hayes is currently Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies, serves on the Board of Directors for the international Society for Historical Archaeology, and is one of the founding proposers of the HSPH program. Her current research centers on the site of Fort Snelling in Minnesota, exploring how carcerality and citizenship are remembered or forgotten in contemporary public interpretation. Other research areas include the archaeology of plantation slavery in New York and the fur trade in the Western Great Lakes region.

 

 

William Jones, Professor

Department: History

email: wpjones@umn.edu

Scholarly Interests: I am a social historian of the United States, with a focus on race and labor in the 20th century. My courses in Oral History will be of particular interest to students in Heritage Studies and Public History

 

Erika Lee, Professor

Department: History; Affiliate Faculty Asian American Studies; Affiliate Faculty American Studies

email: erikalee@umn.edu

Scholarly Interests: Erika Lee is an award-winning American historian, Director of the Immigration History Research Center, Distinguished McKnight University Professor, and the Rudolph J. Vecoli Chair in Immigration History at the University of Minnesota. Her scholarly specialties include migration, race and ethnicity; Asian Americans; transnational U.S. history; and immigration law and public policy. Her book, The Making of Asian America: A History was published by Simon & Schuster in 2015 to wide acclaim. A paperback version was published in 2016; a Chinese language version is forthcoming in 2018. Reviewed in The New York Times, the New Yorker, the LA Times, among other places, it was named a Best Nonfiction Book of 2015 by the Kirkus Reviews, a "10 Can't-Miss History Books of 2015" by History Buffs, and was awarded the 2015 -2016 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature in Adult Non-Fiction from the American Library Association. She is also the author or co-author of the award winning books Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America, (with Judy Yung, Oxford University Press, 2010) and At America’s Gates: Chinese Immigration During the Exclusion Era, 1882-1943 (University of North Carolina Press, 2003) as well as many articles on immigration law and Asian American immigration. She has been awarded numerous national and university fellowships and awards for her research, teaching, and leadership, including the 2017 Dean's Medal from the College of Liberal Arts and the Arthur Red Motley Award for Excellence in Teaching. She is an active public scholar and has been an invited speaker at universities, historical societies, and community organizations around the U.S. and internationally.

 

 

Phyllis Mauch Messenger, Grants Consultant and Editor at the Institute for Advanced Study, University of Minnesota

Institutional Affiliation: Institute for Advanced Study

email: pmessenger@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Phyllis Messenger is an anthropologist/archaeologist who has worked on excavations in Mexico, Honduras, and Minnesota, and led study abroad programs in Mexico, Peru, and Southeast Asia. She has edited several books on archaeological ethics and heritage studies, including The Ethics of Collecting Cultural Property: Whose Culture? Whose Property? (second ed. 1999, University of New Mexico Press), Cultural Heritage Management: A Global Perspective, with George Smith (2010, University Press of Florida), Heritage Values in Contemporary Society, with George Smith and Hilary Soderland (2010, Left Coast Press), and Archaeologists and the Pedagogy of Heritage, with Susan Bender (2 volumes anticipated 2018, University Press of Florida). She has collaborated with the Science Museum of Minnesota on several exhibits, including “MAYA: Hidden Worlds Revealed” (2013) and led public archaeology programs for several Minnesota institutions, including Hamline University. She was a founding member of the Public Education Committee and the Heritage Values Interest Group for the Society for American Archaeology. She is administrative editor for Open Rivers: Rethinking Water, Place & Community, an interdisciplinary, on-line journal of the University of Minnesota (openrivers.umn.edu, established in 2015). She collaborated on development of the HSPH program, and looks forward to
working with students in the program!

 

 

Kristine Miller, Professor

Department: Landscape Architecture

email: mille407@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Kristine Miller’s research addresses public space and its role in public life. Miller argues that designers seeking to provide comfortable public settings may unwittingly concretize in built form, aesthetic representations, and programmatic systems, restrictive definitions of the public and public space.

 

 

Hiromi Mizuno, Associate Professor

Department: History

email: mizuno@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: I have recently begun incorporating Critical Heritage Studies into my work and I continue to be interested in how post-industrial (and postcolonial) society remembers industrialization (and modernization) in various parts of the world. I also teach the memory of WWII, including the politics of war museums in the US and Japan.

 

 

Kevin Murphy, Professor

Departments: History; American Studies

email: kpmurphy@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: history of sexuality; public history; comparative history of women and gender; United States history; cultural and intellectual history; urban history. Murphy is a founding proposer of the HSPH program and is on the editorial board of the Public Historian and on the steering committee of the Humanities Action Lab, which has organized the major public humanities projects The Guantanamo Public Memory Project and States of Incarceration.

 

 

Lin Nelson-Mayson, Director, Goldstein Museum of Design; Director of Graduate Studies, Museum Studies

Institution: Goldstein Museum of Design

email: lnelsonm@umn.edu

Scholarly Interests: Lin Nelson-Mayson has professional experience with a wide range of museum types and locations including Goldstein Museum of Design, ExhibitsUSA (MO), MN Museum of American Art, Columbia Museum of Art (SC), Art Museum of South TX, and Ross County Historical Society (OH). She has held volunteer leadership positions with professional associations at the state (MN Asso. of Museums, SC Museum Federation, and SC Abandoned Cultural Properties Board), regional (Asso. of Midwest Museums, SE Museums Council), and national level (American Alliance of Museums, Asso. of Academic Museums and Galleries, National Alliance of State Museum Associations). She has been Director of Graduate Studies of the University's Museum Studies program since 2012.

 

 

Jean O'Brien, Distinguished McKnight University Professor

Department: History

email: obrie002@umn.edu 

Scholarly Interests: I work in American Indian and Indigenous Studies and Public History. My methodological approaches include social and cultural history as well as Indigenous Studies.

 

 

Yuichiro Onishi, Associate Professor

Department: African American and African Studies; Affiliate Faculty Asian American Studies; American Studies; Asian Languages and Literatures; Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature

email: ohni0001@umn.edu

Scholarly Interests: I am an African Americanist trained as a historian of modern America. I write the history of the African American-led unfinished struggle for democracy in the twentieth century called the Black freedom movement that intersects with places rarely seen as centers of the African American experience, namely Japan and Okinawa. Of late, my scholarly agenda centers on local history research and writing, as well as collaborative community-based research and action. Specifically, I am working on the following two projects: (1) the civil rights unionism of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in St. Paul and Minneapolis between 1925 and 1945; (2) Japanese American resettlement in the Twin Cities between 1942 and 1946 and its impact on an emergent Minnesota-brand of racial liberalism that ultimately buoyed Hubert Humphrey's political leadership, both statewide and nationally. In addition, I continue to investigate the genesis of occupied Okinawa. This long-range research explores U.S. colonialism toward Okinawa during the early Cold War years. At the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, I primarily teach undergraduate courses in African American & African Studies and Asian American Studies. I began my academic career in the Center for Ethnic Studies at the Borough of Manhattan Community College of The City University of New York (CUNY). I have also taught African American studies courses at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan.

 

 

Steven F. Ostrow, Professor

Department: Art History

email: ostro133@umn.edu

Scholarly Interests: My research and teaching engages the material culture of Early Modern Europe, especially Italy, including architecture, urban planning, painting, and sculpture.

 

 

Juliana Hu Pegues, Assistant Professor

Department: American Indian Studies; Asian American Studies; Gender, Women, & Sexuality Studies.

email: jhup@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Dr. Hu-Pegues earned her PhD in American studies from the University of Minnesota and was an assistant professor at Smith College. She is currently working on Settler Space and Time, a book that examines the comparative and contingent racialization and gendering of Native and Asian peoples in territorial Alaska.

 

 

Daniela Sandler, Assistant Professor

Department: Architecture

email: dsandler@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Daniela Sandler is an architectural historian whose research and teaching interests include memory, preservation, and cultural heritage from a global perspective, with a particular focus on Latin America and Europe. Her book Counterpreservation: Architectural Decay in Berlin since 1989 deals with alternative forms of preservation that enable a more socially inclusive and equitable city.

 

 

Ingrid Schneider, Professor

Department: Forest Resources; with advising in Environmental Science, Policy & Management; Graduate faculty in Natural Resource Science & Management; Conservation Sciences; and Water Resources Program

email: ingridss@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: My research focuses on visitor behavior and optimizing experiences. A social-psychological approach guides the majority of my work to inform planning and management at local, state, national and international levels.

 

 

Katherine Solomonson, Associate Professor

Department: Architecture

email: solom003@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Katherine Solomonson teaches architectural and urban history in the Department of Architecture, and also holds positions in the Departments of American Studies, Art History, and Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature. She has a particular interest in the ways in which histories of cultural landscapes intersect with contemporary planning, policy, and historic preservation.

 

Catherine Squires, Professor

Department: Communication Studies; Affiliate Faculty Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies; African American & African Studies; Journalism and Mass Communication

email: squir050@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Catherine R. Squires is Professor of Communication Studies and Director of the Race, Indigeneity, Gender & Sexuality Studies Initiative (RIGS) at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Squires' work investigates the interactions between social identities, media discourses, and publics. She is the author of Dispatches from the Color Line (SUNY, 2007) and African Americans and the Media (Polity, 2009). Her most recent book, The Post-racial Mystique (NYU Press, 2014), explores how a variety of media—the news, network television, and online, independent media—debate, define and deploy the term “post-racial” in their representations of American politics and society.

 

She is also engaged in a long-term partnership with Gordon Parks High School in St. Paul, where she and teams of U of M students work with teachers and students to create publicly-oriented media that explores the history and future development of the Frogtown and Rondo neighborhoods. Visit the Minnesota Historical Society website for more information.

 

 

Chris Taylor, Chief Inclusion Officer at the Minnesota Historical Society; Adjunct Assistant Professor at University of Minnesota

Institutional Affiliation: Minnesota Historical Society

email: cjtaylor@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Chris Taylor is currently ABD in the Organization Development program at the University of St. Thomas. His focus is applying principles of organizational change to the development of inclusive cultural organization. He is currently working on a research project investigating how professionals of color experience the organizational culture of museums. He is interested in examining the oppressive nature of organizational systems, a lack of intercultural competence in most museum staff, and embedded norms that reflect the dominant culture allows in order to apply organizational development principles such as Transformative Learning, Systems Change, Group Dynamics, and Change Management to create an environment of inclusion within the organizational culture of museums.

Chris Taylor has worked with the Minnesota Historical Society for nearly 12 years and is currently the Chief Inclusion Office. He has developed and implemented the Inclusion and Diversity initiative at MNHS. His focus within this initiative is to create a more diverse and engaged workforce, increase intercultural competence of staff, create an inclusive organizational culture and build sustainable relationships with a broader segment of Minnesota communities. He has served on the Board of the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, East Side Freedom Library, Minnesota Association of Museums and the Ramsey County Historical Society. He has also served on the Diversity, Equity, Access, and Inclusion Task Force for the American Alliance of Museum and the Diversity and Inclusion Task Force for the American Association for State and Local History.


 

Ann Waltner, Professor

Department: History

email: waltn001@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: I have made six videos for the Minneapolis Institute of Art talking about objects in their collection as a part of their 100 videos for 100 years project; I made a website in conjunction with the San Francisco/Hong Kong Arts Festival performance of an opera based on the eighteenth-century Chinese novel Dream of the Red Chamber and I have written scripts and performed in two multi-media performance with the early music group Sacabuche. I am interested in forms of public history that I myself do not practice.

 

 

Margaret Werry, Assistant Professor

Affiliate in Asian Languages, Literatures and Anthropology, Moving Image and Media Studies

email: werry001@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: My past research has been on heritage production and museum development in the context of tourism economies and ethnic/indigenous politics, specifically in New Zealand and the Island Pacific. My current work studies the display, interpretation, and handling of human remains in museums of history, anatomy, art, and ethnology, and roadside museums. As a theatre scholar, I am particularly interested in the performance of both people and objects in museums, focusing on the narrative, scenographic, affective, and interactive dimensions of museum experiences, as well as their political ramifications.

 

 

Benjamin Wiggins, Affiliated Assistant Professor

Department: History

email: benwig@umn.edu

 

Scholarly Interests: Benjamin is the Program Director of Digital Arts, Sciences, & Humanities (DASH) for University Libraries and an Affiliated Assistant Professor of History at the University of Minnesota. He has published in The American Historian, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Natural Hazards Observer, and Television and New Media as well as volumes from Intellect, the University of Chicago Press, and Johns Hopkins University Press. Benjamin researches the history of risk assessment across nineteenth- and twentieth-century America. Previously, Benjamin served as the Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also taught in the Department of History and the Department of History & Sociology of Science.

 

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College of Design

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